Tag Archives: Snapchat

Snapchat database hacked, 4.6m user IDs & phone nos. leaked!


Evan Spiegel, Snapchat
Evan Spiegel, Snapchat (Photo credit: jdlasica)
Cover of "Hackers"
Cover of Hackers

Phone numbers and usernames of over 4.6 million users of the popular picture sharing service Snapchat have been leaked online. Hackers have posted the database of these users on a website called SnapchatDB as SQL dump or as CSV text format.

Snapchat database hacked, 4.6m user IDs & phone nos. leaked
Hackers have posted the database of these users on a website called SnapchatDB as SQL dump or as CSV text format.

SnapChatDB claims that the data was acquired through the security exploits documented recently. It said, “Given that it’s been around four months since our last Snapchat release, we figured we’d do a refresher on the latest version, and see which of the released exploits had been fixed (full disclosure: none of them). Seeing that nothing had been really been improved upon (although, stories are using AES/CBC rather than AES/ECB, which is a start), we decided that it was in everyone’s best interests for us to post a full disclosure of everything we’ve found in our past months of hacking the gibson.”

Australia-based Gibson Security recently published a security vulnerability in SnapChat that exposed users’ phone numbers based on their usernames. Snapchat downplayed the security issue with its service. The auto-destruct photo sharing service claimed that it had recently added additional counter-measures and continues to combat spam and abuse. It had said that the potential hack sounds ‘impractical’.

In a blogpost, Snapchat said, “Theoretically, if someone were able to upload a huge set of phone numbers, like every number in an area code, or every possible number in the U.S., they could create a database of the results and match usernames to phone numbers that way. Over the past year we’ve implemented various safeguards to make it more difficult to do. We recently added additional counter-measures and continue to make improvements to combat spam and abuse.” However, SnapchatDB.com’s message indicates that the service did patch the exploit.

On their part, the anonymous group of hackers has claimed that they have stolen the database to raise awareness about holes in Snapchat’s security. To ensure that the information is not misused by cyber criminals, the hackers have redacted the last two digits of the leaked phone numbers to safeguard users’ privacy.

The hackers, however, said they are willing to share the uncensored database on request, ‘under certain circumstances.’

Posted By Mantosh Pal

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Evan Spiegel, Snapchat
Evan Spiegel, Snapchat (Photo credit: jdlasica)
Cover of "Hackers"
Cover of Hackers

Phone numbers and usernames of over 4.6 million users of the popular picture sharing service Snapchat have been leaked online. Hackers have posted the database of these users on a website called SnapchatDB as SQL dump or as CSV text format.

Snapchat database hacked, 4.6m user IDs & phone nos. leaked
Hackers have posted the database of these users on a website called SnapchatDB as SQL dump or as CSV text format.

 

SnapChatDB claims that the data was acquired through the security exploits documented recently. It said, “Given that it’s been around four months since our last Snapchat release, we figured we’d do a refresher on the latest version, and see which of the released exploits had been fixed (full disclosure: none of them). Seeing that nothing had been really been improved upon (although, stories are using AES/CBC rather than AES/ECB, which is a start), we decided that it was in everyone’s best interests for us to post a full disclosure of everything we’ve found in our past months of hacking the gibson.”

Australia-based Gibson Security recently published a security vulnerability in SnapChat that exposed users’ phone numbers based on their usernames. Snapchat downplayed the security issue with its service. The auto-destruct photo sharing service claimed that it had recently added additional counter-measures and continues to combat spam and abuse. It had said that the potential hack sounds ‘impractical’.

In a blogpost, Snapchat said, “Theoretically, if someone were able to upload a huge set of phone numbers, like every number in an area code, or every possible number in the U.S., they could create a database of the results and match usernames to phone numbers that way. Over the past year we’ve implemented various safeguards to make it more difficult to do. We recently added additional counter-measures and continue to make improvements to combat spam and abuse.” However, SnapchatDB.com’s message indicates that the service did patch the exploit.

On their part, the anonymous group of hackers has claimed that they have stolen the database to raise awareness about holes in Snapchat’s security. To ensure that the information is not misused by cyber criminals, the hackers have redacted the last two digits of the leaked phone numbers to safeguard users’ privacy.

The hackers, however, said they are willing to share the uncensored database on request, ‘under certain circumstances.’

 

Posted By Mantosh Pal

 

Hackers reveal 4.6m mobile numbers after Snapchat claims it has safeguards


Website releases usernames and phone numbers of Snapchat users in the US, with the last two digits of each number redacted,
snapchat appPublication of user names and numbers came after 
Snapchat's security was questioned by an Australian security research group.

An anonymous group of hackers has dumped a vast database of what appeared to be 4.6 million Snapchat users’ mobile numbers and users names, just days after Snapchat claimed it had safeguards in place to fix a security vulnerability that could divulge users’ personal information.

@adabot on @snapchat
@adabot on @snapchat (Photo credit: adafruit)

A website called SnapchatDB released the vast database, which included usernames and phone numbers of Snapchat users in the US. The last two digits of each number were redacted by the group.

The site later appeared to have been taken down, but, while accessible, explained that the material had been published to “raise awareness” of the issue.

“This information was acquired through the recently patched Snapchat exploit and is being shared with the public to raise awareness on the issue. The company was too reluctant at patching the exploit until they knew it was too late and companies that we trust with our information should be more careful when dealing with it,” it said.

“For now, we have censored the last two digits of the phone numbers in order to minimise spam and abuse.”

The site also said it might consider releasing the unredacted database “under certain circumstances”.

The publication of the user names and numbers came after details of the vulnerability was made public by an Australian security research group called Gibson Security on Christmas Day. The group outlined how the vulnerability could be exploited, and said Snapchat did not respond to it when it raised the issue months ago.

Gibson Security tweeted it had no involvement in the release of the user information.

“We know nothing about SnapchatDB, but it was a matter of time til something like that happened,” it tweeted.

After Gibson published its findings Snapchat said it took user privacy seriously and replied in a blogpost: “Theoretically, if someone were able to upload a huge set of phone numbers, like every number in an area code, or every possible number in the US, they could create a database of the results and match usernames to phone numbers that way.

“Over the past year we’ve implemented various safeguards to make it more difficult to do. We recently added additional counter-measures and continue to make improvements to combat spam and abuse.”

Snapchat has been contacted for comment on the release of the SnapchatDB database.

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Posted By Mantosh Pal

Facebook is ‘dead and buried’ for young people: Study!


Mary Johnston, Scott Alan Miller, Tammy Hopkin...
Mary Johnston, Scott Alan Miller, Tammy Hopkins and Eric Millen before the York Junior Prom 1994 (Photo credit: SheepGuardingLlama)
English: University College London Union on Go...
English: University College London Union on Gordon Street (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
This is icon for social networking website. Th...
This is icon for social networking website. This is part of Open Icon Library’s webpage icon package. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

LONDON: Facebook is “dead and buried” for young people in the UK, who are moving on to “cooler things”, according to a major study of social media.

Professor Daniel Miller is one of team of eight ethnographic researchers based at University College London who are working on a study across seven countries including India, China, Brazil and the UK to examine social media trends.

Miller said the social networking site was “simply not cool any more”.
“what we’ve learned from working with 16 to 18-years-olds in the UK is that Facebook is not just on the slide, it is basically dead and buried,” said Miller.
Children and teenagers are increasingly  communicating thought newer contenders such as Twitter, Instagram, SnapChat and WhatsApp.
The young people are apparently logging off to avoid the stigma of using the same  site as the older generation and to keep their indiscretions private from relatives,
“What appears to be the most seminal moment in a young person’s decision to leave Facebook was surely that dreaded day your mum sends you a friend request,”
“Parents have worked out how to use the site and see it as a way for the family to remain connected, In response, the young are moving on a cooler thing,”  Miller said!
Miller said the switch was taking place despite the face that none of the rising stars of social media apps can match Facebook for ease of use
“In my school research, the coolest friends are connected to each other via Snapchat, WatsApp is used to communicate with quite close friends and twitter the wider friends, Instagram can include strangers and is used a little differently,” said Miller.
“Facebook, on the other hand, has become the link with older family, or even older siblings who have gone to university,” he said.
“I don’t expect Facebook to necessarily disappear altogether, but I think it’s finished for the young in the UK and I suspect other countries will follow.” said Miller
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Posted By Mantosh Pal

Facebook ‘dead and buried to teens’, research finds


Facebook logo Español: Logotipo de Facebook Fr...
Facebook logo Español: Logotipo de Facebook Français : Logo de Facebook Tiếng Việt: Logo Facebook (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Comprehensive European research has found that teens are leaving the service in droves – and the biggest deterrent is their parents

Beheading films on FacebookTeens are being put off Facebook by friend requests from their parents

 

 

Facebook is ‘dead and buried’ to older teenagers, an extensive European study has found, as the key age group moves on to Twitter, Instagram, WhatsApp and Snapchat.

Researching the Facebook use of 16-18 year olds in eight EU countries, the Global Social Media Impact Study found that as parents and older users saturate Facebook, its younger users are shifting to alternative platforms.

“Facebook is not just on the slide – it is basically dead and buried,” wrote Daniel Miller, lead anthropologist on the research team, who is professor of material culture of University College London.

“Mostly they feel embarrassed to even be associated with it. Where once parents worried about their children joining Facebook, the children now say it is their family that insists they stay there to post about their lives.”

Teens do not care that alternative services are less functional and sophisticated, and they also unconcerned about how information about them is being used commercially or as part of surveillance practice by the security services, the research found.

“What appears to be the most seminal moment in a young person’s decision to leave Facebook was surely that dreaded day your mum sends you a friend request,” wrote Miller.

“It is nothing new that young people care about style and status in relation to their peers, and Facebook is simply not cool anymore.”

In part of the study’s research with Italian Facebook users, 40% of users had never changed their privacy settings and 80% said they “were not concerned or did not care” if their personal data was available and accessed, either by an organisation or an individual.

Information that people choose to publish on Facebook has generally been through a psychological filtering process, researchers found – unlike conversations, photos and video shared through more private tools such as Skype, or on mobile apps.

“Most individuals try to present themselves online the way they think society is expecting them to,” wrote contributing anthropologist Razvan Nicolescu on Thursday.

“It seems that social media works not towards change – of society, notions of individuality and connectedness, and so on – but rather as a conservative force that tends to strengthen the conventional social relations and to reify society as Italians enjoy and recognise it.

“The normativity of the online presence seems to be just one expression of this process.”

Posted By Mantosh Pal